What To Look For In Motivational Speakers For Students

Posted on: 26 October 2017

Motivational speakers for students are a dime a dozen, unless you can get someone who really makes a striking impact on listeners. There are some good speakers out there that can really grab kids' attention and make the kids focus on what is being said. Of course, it also helps to find someone who can tie into what the teachers are teaching in their classrooms right now. Here's what to look for in a motivational speaker.

Relevancy

In education, you have to strike while the iron is hot. Then it is most relevant to the students and the speaker's message really sticks. For example, if your school has recently experienced a shooting incident, speakers who have been defaced or deformed by a gun are exactly what kids need to see. Teens and children alike think that they are invincible, and that they can never be hurt by accidental or intentional gunfire. A speaker, and his or her appearance, can attest otherwise.

Visuals

No, not Powerpoint or a slide reel. Kids these days are every bit as bored with these presentations as you were at the same age. The person, scenes and photos of a gruesome drunk driving accident in which the speaker was a victim, etc., are all the kinds of visuals that really drive a message home. Kids cannot tear their eyes away from things that make them uncomfortable or "grossed out." Yet, these are exactly the kinds of visuals that hold them in their seats and listening to every word.

Movement

Would you rather that the speaker moves all around the auditorium or multipurpose room while he/she speaks, or stand stagnant in one space? Most speakers know that the former is preferential because then more students end up making direct eye contact. Direct eye contact gets these students to pay attention while psyching them out. The students end up thinking that the speaker is targeting them for some reason, so they pay closer attention.

The speaker wants to drive home points with those that he/she makes eye contact with. If you ask a speaker to show you part of the speech he or she gives, and you are checking out because the speaker stands still for too long, that is not a speaker you want. Conversely, you do not want a speaker who moves around too much, as the speech and message lose their effectiveness with every bouncy side-to-side step the speaker makes.

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